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storytelling for the free-spirited

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Rosemary + James: An Adoption Story

storytelling for the free spirited

Adoption is something that has been ingrained into my hopes for a long time. That’s why this story is so sweet + so important—James, forever home. At last.

This is just one example of how Ekisa Ministries is mobilizing Ugandan people to change the lives of marginalized children with disabilities. This home + school for these children changes the way the Ugandan culture sees the stigma of having a disability, and it instantly captured my heart. This is James’s adoption story, told by his mother, Rosemary.

I was living in a community with children who had disabilities. Someone heard of the kids’ needs and told me to help them and direct them to Ekisa. I came to the home and visited one day, and during a time they were holding interviews. So I was interviewed and began working here for a few years–then I met James. 

He was brought from Kampala. When I looked at him, I felt very bad. I felt for all the mothers when they have children with disabilities. James never asked for a disability, and expected his parents to love him. James was very eager when I carried him; a happy man. From that time, we became closer.

I felt as if I was his mother and I started giving him so much love. The way he was looking at me was like he had missed me when I was gone. That was five years ago. 

Now, I am fostering James with plans to adopt him and he makes me so happy, I never get bored when I’m with him. He is so friendly, jolly and kind. When I first met him, he couldn’t even move properly. There was one day, I couldn’t find him. I went to my garden of maize, and I saw the plants shaking. I found him trying to look around the garden. 

At first, the hardest challenge was with the children in the community. He would bite and pinch them. I went and told them James is your brother, so forgive him. I befriended the children, and they became friends with James–even the mothers were his friends. Another challenge has been his seizures. I wanted to take all the measurements I could to prevent them. We’ve taken some time without seizures now.

If you know how to communicate with him at home, he can even help with daily tasks, and he can travel with me. I was eager to see that he could change. I am training him what he can and can’t do. He’s learning to brush his teeth, put on shoes, make his bed, wash himself and plates, mop the house. He’s so helpful. 

In the morning, we take breakfast, go to school, and James knows what vehicle comes to pick him up. He likes school very much, but mostly music class, and he’s very good at counting. Then, we have lunch and nap time in the afternoon. He helps with washing plates and mopping at school. He has so many friends.

I love being a mom because I have so many things I want to teach him. 

Adoption is something that has been ingrained into my hopes for a long time. That’s why this story is so sweet + so important—James, forever home. At last.

This is just one example of how Ekisa Ministries is mobilizing Ugandan people to change the lives of marginalized children with disabilities. This home + school for these children changes the way the Ugandan culture sees the stigma of having a disability, and it instantly captured my heart. This is James’s adoption story, told by his mother, Rosemary.

I was living in a community with children who had disabilities. Someone heard of the kids’ needs and told me to help them and direct them to Ekisa. I came to the home and visited one day, and during a time they were holding interviews. So I was interviewed and began working here for a few years–then I met James. 

He was brought from Kampala. When I looked at him, I felt very bad. I felt for all the mothers when they have children with disabilities. James never asked for a disability, and expected his parents to love him. James was very eager when I carried him; a happy man. From that time, we became closer.

I felt as if I was his mother and I started giving him so much love. The way he was looking at me was like he had missed me when I was gone. That was five years ago. 

Now, I am fostering James with plans to adopt him and he makes me so happy, I never get bored when I’m with him. He is so friendly, jolly and kind. When I first met him, he couldn’t even move properly. There was one day, I couldn’t find him. I went to my garden of maize, and I saw the plants shaking. I found him trying to look around the garden. 

At first, the hardest challenge was with the children in the community. He would bite and pinch them. I went and told them James is your brother, so forgive him. I befriended the children, and they became friends with James–even the mothers were his friends. Another challenge has been his seizures. I wanted to take all the measurements I could to prevent them. We’ve taken some time without seizures now.

If you know how to communicate with him at home, he can even help with daily tasks, and he can travel with me. I was eager to see that he could change. I am training him what he can and can’t do. He’s learning to brush his teeth, put on shoes, make his bed, wash himself and plates, mop the house. He’s so helpful. 

In the morning, we take breakfast, go to school, and James knows what vehicle comes to pick him up. He likes school very much, but mostly music class, and he’s very good at counting. Then, we have lunch and nap time in the afternoon. He helps with washing plates and mopping at school. He has so many friends.

I love being a mom because I have so many things I want to teach him. 

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